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Arkansas State University

Citation Style Guide : Turabian

Basic introduction into AMA, APA, Chicago, MLA and Turabian citation styles.

Turabian Manual for Writers

Turabian Manual for Writers

Resources

Turabian citation can be used for all subjects.

If you need more information than what is given in this guide, try the following sources:

Notice

This is only intended to be a guide. Your professor may have specific or additional requirements not listed in this guide.

Turabian Citation Style

Note: The Turabian citation style is based on the Chicago citation style and includes minor modifications. You may use Kate Turabian's A Manual for Writers for both Turabian and Chigaco styles reference.

Citations by Formats

Print books:
Print books are ones you can hold in your hands.
 

Format:

 

Author(s). Book Title. Edition number (only if it is the second edition or above). City, State (or Country) of publisher: Publisher's Name, copyright year.

     

Example:

 

Meyer, Stephenie. Twilight. New York: Little, Brown and Co., 2005.

Online Books:
Online books are any that you need a computer to read. Sometimes they are referred to as eBooks or electronic books.
 

Format:

 

Author(s). Book Title. Edition number (only if it is the second edition or above). City, State (or Country) of publisher: Publisher's Name, copyright year. URL (accessed date).

     

Example:

 

Collin, P.H. Dictionary of Business. 4th ed. London: A & C Black, 2006. http://www.credoreference.com/vol/525 (accessed February 9, 2009). 

Print Journals:
Print journals are periodicals, magazines, newspapers, etc. you can hold in your hands.

 

Format:

 

Author(s). "Article Title." Journal Name vol. no (date): inclusive pages.

     

Example:

 

Richards, Bernard. "Henry James, Oscar Wilde and Aesthetic Culture." Essays in Criticism 58. no 4 (October 2008): 363-369.

Online Journals:
Online journals are periodicals, magazines, newspapers, etc that you need a computer to read. Sometimes they are referred to as eJournals or electronic journals.
 

Format:

 

Author(s). "Article Title." Journal Name vol. no (date): inclusive pages. URL [accessed date].

     

Example:

 

Gill, A.A. "Sicily Crypts - Where the Dead Don't Sleep." National Geographic 215. no. 2 (February 2009): 118-133. http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com
/2009/02/sicily-crypts/gill-text
(accessed February 9, 2009).

Web Sites

Format:

  Author (or, if no author is available, the name of the organization responsible for the site). "Title." Name of the Web site, URL (accessed date).
     
Example:   American Cancer Society. "Detailed Guide: Castleman Disease." Cancer Reference Information, http://www.cancer.org/docroot/CRI/CRI_2_3x.asp?dt=70 (accessed February 9, 2009).
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Formatting Your Paper

Chicago Spacing Example

Formatting

  • 1" margins preferred
  • 12pt font preferred
  • Doublespace
     

Page number

  • Flushed with the right margin.
  • Start with 1, title page does not count toward page count.
     

Header & Title

  • No header or title
     

Footnotes

  • Footnotes should be in they appear in the paper
  • Whenever you have a full bibliography at the end of your paper, use shortened footnotes.
  • If you do not have a bibliography, the first time a reference appears in your paper use a long or full footnote then use shortened footnotes for additional instances.
  • Ibid indicates that you are reusing the same source immediately before, but using a different page
Chicago Title Page Example

Formatting

  • 1" margins preferred
  • 12pt font preferred
  • Doublespace
     

Page number & Header

  • No page number or header

 
Title

  • 1/3 down page
  • Centered
  • All caps
     

Name, class and date

  • 2/3 down page
  • Centered
  • Singlespace
  • Date should be Month Day, Year
Chicago Bibliography Page

Formatting

  • 1" margins preferred
  • 12pt font preferred
  • Single space entries
  • Leave empty space between entries
  • Alphabetical order
     

Page number

  • Flushed with the right margin.
     

Bibliography Title

  • Title the page "Bibliography"
  • Centered
  • Do not underline, bold or italicize.
  • Leave two space between "Bibliography" and first entry.
     

Indentation

A hanging indent is when the first line of text is flushed with the margin while the other lines within the text are indented in.

Here's how to create hanging indents in Microsoft Word:
 

Step 1:

Select the text you want to be hanging indents

       Selecting the text

 

Step 2:

From the "Page Layout" tab, click on the Paragraph Settings icon.

Menu Select

 

Step 3:

In the middle of this box will be your indentation options.

Under "Special" select "Hanging" then hit the "OK" button.

       Selecting the indentation

 

Success!

You have have hanging indents!

       Final Product
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